Delphine Boutet.

Delphine Boutet. "I am working on letting go of the classical aesthetics"

Delphine Boutet
Delphine BoutetMarcus Palmqvist

Delphine Boutet grew up in Bordeaux, one of France's major wine-producing regions. As a little girl, she wanted to dance just as her sister was doing, and even after only a few years of dancing lessons, her goal was clear: She was going to be a professional dancer.

Left home as a 14-year-old Delphine was lucky in having a teacher who encouraged her to go further. When she was 14 years of age she had already moved away from home to start attending dance school in Cannes. Here she trained in classical ballet but also had contemporary dance, folk dance and jazz dance on her timetable. In her early teens, she took part in a festival involving dancers from all over the world. "Those were really exciting weeks which have had a great influence on me. I discovered so many different types of dance from other cultures," she relates.

After her training, Delphine began her professional career as a dancer at the Ballet National de Marseille. There, she was given the opportunity to work with many different choreographers. The fact that she decided to make the move to Gothenburg in 2009 was a natural consequence of her time in Marseille. Now, Delphine is dancer in GöteborgsOperans Danskompani, and she still has the same fascination for different cultures and for developing her dancing. One of the challenges is to let go of the aesthetics of classical ballet and to express more of her own personality instead.

"I want someone to challenge me to do things that I have never done before. To move in a different direction, take a different route, develop and do things that don't come too naturally to me.” Delphine Boutet

Demanding auditions and personal development
For dancers who want to develop, it is an advantage to work with different choreographers and dancers, which is now exactly what is happening in Gothenburg. Delphine says that choreographers often have little time for auditions. For the dancers, it is important quickly to show what they are capable of and who they could be on stage. Being able to dance is not always enough, because many choreographies contain elements of drama.

"Contemporary dance is current dance, it arises in the moment. People experiment with possible movements, and try out different ways of approaching the work by using their bodies. What that conveys depends on our own feelings, on the energy between us as dancers and on the communication with the audience," says Delphine.

Affected by ”Hemland?”
Delphine explains that working on the season's theme and on the ”Hemland?” performance has affected the dancers deeply.

"Here in Gothenburg, many of us are far away from home. It is a choice we always have to make – to be close to work or close to family. I was really moved by the process when we were rehearsing ”Hemland?”. The issue of what – and where – home is for me in particular, has remained with me. I think it affects everyone as soon as they start reflecting on it," says Delphine.

A challenge to stand still on stage ”Hemland” is a work which is close to Delphine's own emotions, but at other times, as a dancer, she has to express emotions that do not ring so well with her. Delphine was injured when Alexander Ekman's "La La Land" was created for the first time in Gothenburg. She was given a specially choreographed role in the performance and, physically, it did not involve much movement, although it was still full of challenges.

"It was difficult to move so little, to stand still on the stage," Delphine relates. "I was supposed to be completely content and happy in La La Land for 45 minutes, almost without moving at all. However, inside, I was more frustrated than content right then. At the same time, it is a role that has a great deal of freedom, and I have danced it many times now."

In spring 2013 you can see Delphine dance in productions such as Body Remix, Rite of Spring and 33 Rue Vandenbranden.


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