David Wilde.

David Wilde. "The performance is my moment."

David Wilde
David WildeMarcus Palmqvist.

David Wilde was born in Germany and trained in his home town of Dresden. When he was ten he started dance school, but the fact that it turned out to be dance was a bit of an accident. "I had lots of interests at that time, but dance was simply enough of a challenge and fun to make me continue," he relates.

"I had inspiring people around me and once I had got through that teenage period when you are growing in all directions at the same time, I realized that my body began to find itself and that I was able to manage difficult movements. You might say that I grew into the world of dance."

"Before any new performance, you work on yourself, on the dance, the choreography and the connection between us as dancers. That work is hard. But when the time comes for the premiere, everything changes. The things that were hard during the process can become absolutely fantastic when you are on stage." / David Wilde

Dancing full-time, studying by distance learning
David came to Gothenburg in 2003, and during his time with the company, he has also taken a couple of years' sabbatical to work with dance companies in Holland and Germany. In July 2010, he returned to GöteborgsOperans Danskompani. David now combines dance with studying International Relations through distance learn course at a British university.

"It is not possible to dance forever at a professional level, and some forward planning is required if you want to do something else at the end of your dancing career. I am going to have a different working life, a new career," says David.

"So now I get up early, study for a while, dance all day and then go home to do some more studying. It is hard-going, but the idea of eventually being able to work on the big issues in the world - politics, climate change, the environment and economics – that's what motivates me to carry on.”

An advantage of working with different creative people
David has worked with three artistic directors during his time with the company. They have all had their own special ways of working and, for the dancers, working with so many different works and choreographers is a rewarding challenge.

In addition, of course, it is hard physical work – and David says that even dancers have their limits. "You are developing all the time, finding new tools and becoming stronger as a person – but not all dancers can do everything. We have different preconditions."

The reward comes on stage
Once the dancers are on stage, facing the audience, the hard work is often forgotten. "The performance is truly my moment. Obviously I am there for the audience, but I also do it for myself," David says.

"Sometimes the link to the other dancers feels particularly distinct and you feel that we have achieved something really special. That feeling is inspiring – you can almost become addicted to it. That's something that will always stay with me, even once I eventually change profession and career.”

In spring 2013, you can see David dance in The Rite of Spring and 33 Rue Vandenbranden.


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